Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

A New Angle of Recruitment Sales

Many employers continually accept résumés, even if they aren’t currently hiring, so keeping the channels of communication with possible employees and those who might be hiring eventually is a good idea.

The purpose of recruitment advertising is obvious; it is designed to attract possible employees. Although the need for employees on the part of advertisers has filled the need for ads on the part of ad departments, a tough economy, and other recruitment resources, sometimes makes these ads a tough sell. However, there are ways to combat objections to “unneeded” recruitment ads, and it starts by creating a need that is more complex than simply advertising an open job.

Carol Richer, the owner of Sales Training Plus, suggests that advertising for recruitment is about more than just looking for employees, it’s also about establishing brand pride and continued performance for current employees, keeping up with the competition in the same market and maintaining top of the mind awareness.

When you make that call to clients or potentials to ask if they have employment openings, also mention that while an opening is a great reason to advertise, they would be remiss on an opportunity if they choose not to while their competitors consistently run recruitment ads.

Since recruitment ads can be used for various reasons, it shouldn’t be difficult to overcome objections when your clients might have doubts. First, let them know that if inter-industry competitors are running ads, it’s a good idea to run one too, because, as Richer says, “Recruitment ads are great for maintaining a good image and give businesses a competitive edge.” Ads contribute more than just a call to action. They also show that your clients are competitive within their industry and help to generate TOMA.

“While training an ad department in Montreal, a [trade school] was contacted to inquire about employment openings. They had nothing available, and didn’t want to place an ad. After the call, I asked the rep who made the call if she suggested other reasons for placing a recruitment ad, and after researching industry competitors and calling back with information about other inter-industry ads, the [trade school] decided to place a recruitment ad.” Richer’s anecdote illustrates how businesses can be concerned with their image, but do not necessarily understand the impact of a recruitment ad.

Recruitment ads do not have to be directed at general customers and passive job seekers, but can also be used to help motivate employees within the business placing the ad. “Employees will be filled with pride when they see a big, beautiful ad for the place that they work,” Richer says. “They will also be motivated to keep up a satisfactory performance if they feel like their employers are consistently looking for new talent.”

Many employers continually accept résumés, even if they aren’t currently hiring, so keeping the channels of communication with possible employees and those who might be hiring eventually is a good idea. This strategy also helps employers understand the skills of the pool they will be hiring from, and therefore helps them make better choices about the skills that are necessary to get the job done and those that are preferred but not required.

With all the reasons beyond beginning the process of hiring someone new, you should have no problem helping your clients overcome objections to placing a recruitment ad. Since it can be beneficial to their status within their industry, to the morale of their employees and the generation of TOMA, the multifaceted quality of a recruitment ad is a real winner.