Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

Managerial Communication Basics:

A Series for Improving Your Methods
To be effective, leaders must know and consistently exhibit positive communication habits.

In the world of print and online media, transitions to the next big thing are rampant and managers are left relaying these changes to employees. Each medium has its merits, but navigating ad-based revenue can be challenging for both manager and sales staff. The key to a fluid move is communication. This concept seems like a standard component of managerial life, but to be effective, leaders must know and consistently exhibit positive communication habits. Things such as “Yes, I am in regular contact with my department” or “Yes, I’m aware of ongoing issues” don’t mean you have created and/or maintained the kind of connection that results in productive, flexible employees or effective conflict resolution.

The issue of print versus digital will not be resolved any time soon since there is still value in both. Otherwise, in this fast-paced age of obsolescence, print would have already disappeared. Successfully managing these transitions and situations mean you will be able to capitalize on previously established communication groundwork. You may need to be the middle ground for two opposing views, in which case, keeping the goal at the forefront during negotiating various opinions/experience will keep your sales team focused on what is important.

In managing your most vital source, your employees, there are some useful basics that should be fundamental to any leader’s style. According to the Dale Carnegie Training blog (blog.dalecarnegie.com), successful presentation tips also apply to one-on-one communication: who is the audience, what is the purpose and what is the message? Either alone or in groups, know your employees and how best to reach them.

When it is time to collaborate, fostering open communication is vital. Be able to hear the good, the bad and the ugly about what employees’ experiences have been when they are successful and what contributed to failures.

When it is time to collaborate, fostering open communication is vital. Be able to hear the good, the bad and the ugly about what employees’ experiences have been when they are successful and what contributed to failures. If they feel their voices are heard and considered, they will be more invested in the evolution of departmental processes. Before meetings, have employees write down their thoughts so they are able to come to a meeting ready to listen and not worry about forgetting their own points/ideas. Active listening basics, such as eye contact and nodding, also encourage free expression.

This series will next address specific communication habits that will help both during and in between transitions.