Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

Make Every Sales Call Count

While you should strive to make your client comfortable with you and your ad department, make sure you’re always getting to the point and taking the next step in the sales process in order to ensure you’re not wasting your customer’s (and your own) valuable time.

 

While new technologies continue to outmode face-to-face and telephone sales calls, it’s important that when you do make a sales call to potential and existing clients, you make it worth their time. In an interview with Inc.com, Jeffrey Seeley, the CEO of Carew International, came up with a few major mistakes to avoid during sales calls in order to make every call count.

1. Don’t Go Too Far Off Track. Conversing with the client on a personal level is important to making them feel comfortable and chip away at the feeling that the sales call is an inconvenience. However, it’s important to not go over board with friendly conversation and forget the reason why you are making the call in the first place. While you should strive to make your client comfortable with you and your ad department, make sure you’re always getting to the point and taking the next step in the sales process in order to ensure you’re not wasting your customer’s (and your own) valuable time.

2. Don’t Let the Customer Go Too Far Off Track Either. In terms of friendly and sometimes off-topic conversation, it can be a two-way road. While you’re monitoring your own conversational tangents, make sure you’re monitoring the customer’s as well. It could be work- or non-work-related conversation, but it can still be a roadblock to making the sale. While you should always listen to your customer and give them the time and attention they deserve, don’t let it derail your sale. Make sure you’re guiding them through the process and keeping them on point when the conversation begins to stray.

3. The Art of Conversation. With Seeley’s other two points in mind, conversation is still integral to making a sale. In order to meet your client’s needs, you need to learn about them, their business, their customers, their advertising needs and so much more! To unearth this information, you may construct a whole list of questions to ask your client, however, don’t pose it as such. It can feel overwhelming and impersonal to be asked one question after another. Instead, try to work these questions into normal conversation and show a genuine interest for learning about the client. If you balance this with Seeley’s other two suggestions, you will be sure to make the sales call personable, productive and certainly worth your and your client’s time!