Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

Leveraging Video for Real Estate

Creating a video for the sake of staying up-to-date on technology trends is pointless if no one is going to watch it. However, Boardman also noted an NARĀ® survey that found homebuyers would like their real estate agents to use video. That, in addition to the rise of video at large, points to its undeniable worth.

Video is increasingly playing a larger role in branding, marketing and overall business strategies, as its daily use is on the rise, especially with the growth in smartphone and tablet owners. Video offers a valuable opportunity for brands to connect with their customers and create dynamic presences. Video could be put to good use by all of your clients, no matter which vertical, but today, we’ll discuss why you should talk to Realtors® about getting on board.

Teresa Boardman, a broker based in St. Paul, Minn. and the founder of the St. Paul Real Estate Blog, shared her thoughts on video’s role in the real estate industry in her Inman News® column, “Do Video Right, or Don’t Do It at All.” Boardman admitted that she, herself, doesn’t use video, and doesn’t think she will anytime soon. More so, she intended to target Realtors® who recognize the rise in video and use it in order to stay on trend with developments in technology. However, she finds, more often than not, Realtors® don’t use video well. Consequently, Boardman posed an important question: If you’re not using video wisely, why use it at all?

For the most part, we agree with Boardman’s assessment. Your clients shouldn’t give less than 100 percent to any of their efforts. Creating a video for the sake of staying up-to-date on technology trends is pointless if no one is going to watch it, because you didn’t take the time to create a well-produced one. However, Boardman also noted an NAR® survey that found homebuyers would like their real estate agents to use video. That, in addition to the rise of video at large, points to its undeniable worth. Therefore, we think you should use video, but if your clients are going to create a video, make sure they are committing to creating one that is worth the time it will take homebuyers to watch it.

According to Boardman, not only do Realtors® produce uninteresting videos with shoddy quality, she found that there is a belief amongst agents that they should be the star of the videos. However, she finds that these videos don’t offer much insight into the agent’s work. While we think your real estate clients could and should be in the videos they produce, they shouldn’t be the sole focus. Homebuyers aren’t going to stay tuned for a poorly shot video of your client awkwardly standing in front of a camera reciting canned information. If the intention is to create a dynamic presence and brand, then the video, too, should be dynamic.

A good start would be including footage of homes your clients are selling, after all, that’s what homebuyers want. Boardman also mentioned seeing videos of a couple of Realtors® sitting down for a discussion about their work experience, which we think has great potential. However, she found that these videos were also poorly planned and off the cuff. The dialogue should feel natural, but you still need to plan the video, from the lighting to what the participating agents are wearing. You also need someone who knows what they’re doing behind the camera. After all, if you’re leveraging video, then all of the visual elements are integral to the final cut.

This concept, however, is great. Your real estate clients are experts in their field, and they have a lot of valuable information homebuyers would be interested in hearing. It’s a great opportunity for your clients to share their knowledge on the real estate industry and the local real estate landscape (remember, localized information is some of the most valuable to viewers), while also proving themselves as seasoned professionals in their field. Homebuyers will listen and be more likely to turn to your client when they’re ready to buy their next home.