Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

Help Unwanted

Managers face scrutiny and lost tax incentives when avoiding the unemployed applicants
Many companies insist they do not wish to discriminate against the unemployed, yet oppressing those who are currently out of work is a recent phenomenon that is gaining political and media attention.

Although the newspaper industry is far from stable, the need for quality sales reps that meet the qualifications of the rising standards in advertising sales is exorbitant.  Many companies insist they do not wish to discriminate against the unemployed, yet oppressing those who are currently out of work is a recent phenomenon that is gaining political and media attention. In fact, democrats in both chambers of Congress are seeking to make the discriminatory hiring decision a federal crime.

According to a recent CNNMoney.com article, some job postings include restrictions such as “must be currently employed.” The article detailed that while these employers are looking for shortcuts to whittle down the list of applicants, they are simply conducting and constructing bad business. These close-minded employers are prolonging the recession — not to mention missing out on federal tax incentives.

In an interview with The Huffington Post, Judy Conti, federal advocacy coordinator for the National Employment Law Project, states, “In the current economy, where millions of people have lost their jobs through absolutely no fault of their own, I find it beyond unconscionable that any employer would not consider unemployed workers for current job openings.” The interview continues by showing “a company’s choice to ignore unemployed applicants and recycle the current workforce ignores the effect of the recession on millions of highly-qualified workers and could prolong the unemployment crisis.”

According to data from the Labor Department there are about 5.5 people looking for work in every job available."

According to data from the Labor Department there are about 5.5 people looking for work in every job available. Excluding the applicants in your pool that have gaps in employment is a devastating trend in employer behavior that is costing you in revenue potential and in taxes. Currently, there are several government-sponsored programs that support hiring the qualified unemployed; more specifically, programs offering tax incentives and payroll tax exemptions are now federally backed, giving employers monetary enticement to avoid discrimination. 

Many newspapers are having a hard enough time finding qualified applicants for their classified sales positions; cutting out the unemployed is simply narrowing your opportunities. The stance of recruitment should not concern itself with reusing the existing workforce but rather should transition to attracting qualified applicants, no matter their current employment status.

Attracting qualified applicants begins internally with the outlook on recruitment. A continuously recruiting ad department always has candidates in line, and the pressure for performance is present for the current staff. Increased performance leads to increased revenue. Those who forgo recruitment until a position is vacant have few applicants, and rarely are they adequately qualified.

Unemployment is, for many, not a choice. It does not mean they are unqualified, and certainly does not mean they are incapable. Often employers fear long-term gaps between employment lead to outdated skills and pass over those resumes without a second thought. Instead, avoid discrimination and test their abilities fairly, as you would with any applicant, during the interview process.