Business information written specifically for newspaper advertising departments

Ad Design for Print & Online Bundles

When designing an advertisement, attempt to have a double-goal mindset: print and online advertisement. That way, when you sell a bundle package, there will be minimal changes necessary to make it conducive to both markets, while maintaining enough differences to still make it “worth the money” of the bundle for the advertiser.

As a sales rep, you’re always in need of a way to automate your tactics, and speed up everything you do. When designing an advertisement, attempt to have a double-goal mindset: print and online advertisement. That way, when you sell a bundle package, there will be minimal changes necessary to make it conducive to both markets, while maintaining enough differences to still make it “worth the money” of the bundle for the advertiser. Much of the content on both types of advertisement is similar.

LAYOUT OF AN AD

  • Headline
  • Body
  • Legalities
  • Illustration
  • Contact

Streamline the process of producing both ads for one company in a bundled package by utilizing similar techniques for creating the layouts.

HEADLINES

In print, headlines should be short and sweet, no more than 15 words. They should be functional and balanced with the remainder of the ad. They should follow the rule of thirds: 1/3 headline, 1/3 illustration, 1/3 body/slogan.

Online, the headline should also use the rule of thirds, and remain functional and clear. It should describe exactly what the reader is going to see in the ad, and entice the reader to want to buy the vehicle advertised. Colors are essential. Use bold sans serif fonts in blues or greens.

To make a smooth transition between your print ad and online ad, put headlines in the same location in the ad, using the same sans serif font and always use color online and, if available, in print.

BODY

The body should contain a description of the offer, lead the reader to action (“Call,” “Buy,” “Visit”), create a sense of urgency and limit the risks. Avoid going into detail about the background of the company and the use of slander or any negative copy.

In print, use an active voice, targeting your audience. Use words like “you” and avoid “we.” Keep paragraphs no more then 4–6 lines of 8–10 words.

Online copy is focused on traditional marketing strategies: seasonal sales, discounts and online sales. Some of the most effective ads use short copy to bring the visitor to the vendor’s website, then hit them with the full pitch. This is beneficial for newspapers because you’re simply enticing the visitor to go to the vendor website, the advertisement can even link directly to it. That way you’re helping them get the information they want, without shoving it down their throat.

LEGALITIES

In both online and in print, it is vital you’re following all regulations according to both federal and local advertising regulations. Check the FTC’s laws, claims and regulations.

ILLUSTRATION

Illustrations should work with the copy, not against it. In print, you can use a caption to draw the reader into the illustration, just avoid using empty labels. Try to show the product in use, for a vehicle, that may be a little difficult, but if you can get a photo of the vehicle in its “natural setting” that will create a sense of motion in the viewer’s mind. In both online and in print, photos are generally the most effective technique, rather than graphics or no artwork.

In an online ad, try using a photo that links to a video. Your video should be clear and add to your copy.

CONTACT

Remember to include the contact information, slogan, logo and address. In print, map can be useful, as well, if space allows.